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The Richmond Crime Almanac 

Where, when and how criminals struck in 2014.

click to enlarge cover05_crime_no_headlines.jpg

In his state of the city address last week, Mayor Dwight Jones touted the city’s fifth straight year of violent crime reduction. He said it was “the lowest rate we’ve seen since I’ve lived in Richmond.”

While the city marked a 14 percent increase in homicides and similar increase in sex offenses, crimes in every other category either dropped or held steady in 2014. The result was an overall 4 percent reduction in crime.

But those big-picture statistics never tell the whole story. Crime was up or remained high in some neighborhoods while dropping in others. Plus, have you ever wondered what neighborhood saw the most arrests for prostitution, kidnapping, drunkenness or stolen mopeds?

For the second year, Style has folded the Richmond Police Department’s crime-numbers report into its analysis of a publicly available database of every incident that police reported last year. The result is an illustrated snapshot of crime in Richmond during 2014.

Click any neighborhood for complete stats.

Methodology and notes: These infographics are based on statistics and categories published by the Richmond Police Department. Crime rates are measured using neighborhood population estimates, which are based on 2010 U.S. Census data.

While crime rates are a useful and widely used tool to normalize crime data across areas with varied populations, they fail to take into account commercial activity in areas that otherwise have very small populations — for example, the city center, where relatively few people live but many travel and work every day. Every area with a crime rate higher than 25 incidents per 100 residents in Richmond is in an area with commercial activity that draws large numbers of residents from beyond the neighborhood.

The data also includes only crimes reported to the Richmond Police Department. It doesn’t include offenses reported to Virginia Commonwealth University police or other departments, for example, which don’t make crime data available in comparable formats.

The categories listed also don’t conform to the FBI’s uniform crime reporting standard and shouldn’t be used to compare crime in Richmond to other localities.

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