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Another Bike Boulevard Could Be in the Works 

City considers second project to mix bicycle and vehicular traffic.

A bicyclist rides through the fan, which will soon become more connected because of the Floyd Avenue Bike Boulevard. The city is considering a second bike-friendly corridor in Church Hill.

Scott Elmquist

A bicyclist rides through the fan, which will soon become more connected because of the Floyd Avenue Bike Boulevard. The city is considering a second bike-friendly corridor in Church Hill.

The city is considering a second bike boulevard, which would span the two-mile length of North 29th Street, in Church Hill.

Council is expected to consider whether to ask for federal funds for part of the $650,000 project. If approved, the city would be expected to provide a 20-percent match of $130,000.

The proposal comes as construction on the Floyd Avenue Bike Boulevard is set to begin next month. Widespread disapproval shadowed the project, with Fan residents worrying about the availability of parking. The boulevard will run from Thompson Street to Monroe Park.

Like the Floyd Avenue project, Church Hill’s bike-friendly corridor will be engineered to discourage cut-through traffic while slowing vehicular traffic traveling straight through. Traffic calming infrastructure, enhanced crosswalks, pavement markings and ADA-compliant wheelchair ramps will be installed in phases.

Areas such as Libby Hill Park to the south, the Fairfield Court Public Housing project, the Capital Trail and Armstrong High School -- which has a bicycle skills course on campus -- would be connected via the route.

Council will consider federal funding for two more projects, which also would receive a 20-percent match from the city.

The Bank/Franklin Street Bike Lane would link the State Capitol, starting at 12th Street, to Main Street Station. Sidewalks also would be widened on the north side of Bank Street near the Capitol visitors center. The total cost of the project is $380,000, with the city’s match totaling $76,000.

Buffered bike lanes on First and Second streets could span 12 blocks from Spring Street at the Virginia War Memorial, where they will connect with existing bike lanes on Second Street that cross over the Downtown Expressway. The lanes will end at the Interstate 95 overpass on Duval Street.

Planners aim for the lanes to provide improved bike infrastructure links from the rest of the city to Lee Bridge and Oregon Hill. The neighborhood and bridge were recently linked via bike lanes.

The project is estimated to cost $300,000, with a match of $60,000.

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